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Difference between the Boomi Generic JMS Connector and Boomi Solace JMS Connector

sjaaksjaak Member Posts: 4
edited December 2019 in PubSub+ Software

Hi,
we're evaluating Solace in combination with Boomi. What are the differences between the Boomi Generic JMS Connector or the Boomi Solace JMS Connector?

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Comments

  • swenhelgeswenhelge Member, Employee Posts: 12 Solace Employee

    Hello and a Happy New Year to you,
    It really depends on the use case which connector is more appropriate to use - the differences are:
    Generic JMS Connector:

    • Mandates use of JNDI - which means destinations have to be defined upfront in the Solace message broker's JMS JNDI configuration
    • Dynamic Request/Reply is not supported

    Solace branded JMS Connector

    • Can use dynamic queues/topics
    • Only supports Direct QoS
    • Supports dynamic topics/queues as well as wildcard subscriptions
    • Non-transactional

    If your use case allows to define all destinations up-front and requires transactions / persistence you would use the generic connector.
    If you use fine grained topics in your use case you most likely will need to use dynamic destinations or wildcards on subscribers and hence you would use the Solace branded connector.

    Finally you can also use MQTT and HTTP/REST connectors in Boomi to connect to Solace - this may appropriate in certain situations as well - e.g. HTTP/REST could be useful in situations where you need to connect through firewalls.

  • swenhelgeswenhelge Member, Employee Posts: 12 Solace Employee

    Hi,

    It depends on the use case which connector is appropriate - I'll list the differences below and add a few comments ..
    Generic JMS Connector

    • Mandates usage of JNDI – all destinations must be defined upfront in the Broker's JMS JNDI configuration
    • Dynamic Req/Reply cannot be used

    Solace JMS Connector

    • Does not use JNDI, Supports dynamic queue/topic creation
    • Only supports Direct QoS
    • Does not support transactions
    • Supports wild card subscriptions
      If your use case allows for upfront definition of destinations and requires persistent, transactional messaging the Generic JMS Connector is the right choice.
      If you use fine grained topics you would most likely want to create destinations on the fly and also configure subscribers with wild card topic subscriptions - hence you would use the Solace branded connector

    Finally - you can also use the HTTP/REST and MQTT connectors in Boomi to connect to Solace. For example - the HTTP protocol may be appropriate if you need to connect across firewalls/network zones. Solace also supports publishing messages to REST services exposed by Boomi using REST Delivery Points (RDP).

  • jeremyjeremy Administrator Posts: 30 admin

    @swenhelge is this something you could assist with?

  • swenhelgeswenhelge Member, Employee Posts: 12 Solace Employee

    Hi,

    It depends on the use case which connector is appropriate - I'll list the differences below and add a few comments ..
    Generic JMS Connector

    • Mandates usage of JNDI – all destinations must be defined upfront in the Broker's JMS JNDI configuration
    • Dynamic Req/Reply cannot be used
      Solace JMS Connector

    • Does not use JNDI, Supports dynamic queue/topic creation

    • Only supports Direct QoS
    • Does not support transactions
    • Supports wild card subscriptions
      If your use case allows for upfront definition of destinations and requires persistent, transactional messaging the Generic JMS Connector is the right choice.
      If you use fine grained topics you would most likely want to create destinations on the fly and also configure subscribers with wild card topic subscriptions - hence you would use the Solace branded connector

    Finally - you can also use the HTTP/REST and MQTT connectors in Boomi to connect to Solace. For example - the HTTP protocol may be appropriate if you need to connect across firewalls/network zones. Solace also supports publishing messages to REST services exposed by Boomi using REST Delivery Points (RDP).

  • swenhelgeswenhelge Member, Employee Posts: 12 Solace Employee
    edited January 6

    Hope this helps, sjaak

  • sjaaksjaak Member Posts: 4
    edited January 14

    Hi Sven,
    Sorry for my late reply but I recently joined this community. It appears that I haven't received email notifications of your replies.

    Looking at it, the way we want to work with Boomi and Solace is support for dynamic queue/topic creation. The reason is simple: that is exactly what Boomi does already when you use the Boomi MQ solution. So that is why I tested the branded Solace connector. Thanks! :smile:

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